The family of Nicole Brown Simpson recalls the agonizing consequences of her murder in Part 2 of the docuseries

The relatives of Nicole Brown Simpson reminisce about the “horrific ordeal we endured” following the twin murders.

In the concluding segments of the Lifetime documentary series The Life and Murder of Nicole Brown Simpson, broadcasted on June 2, the kin and companions of O.J. Simpson’s murdered former spouse reflected on her interment, his notorious vehicular pursuit, and subsequent apprehension. Denise Brown, Nicole’s sister, described the experience as a real-life “horrific ordeal,” which included the transfer of their two offspring, Sydney and Justin, to O.J. Simpson following his acquittal.

The third and fourth installments revealed previously undisclosed information about the probing into Nicole’s and her friend Ron Goldman’s murders on June 12, 1994 — such as the discovery of a set of keys from Nicole’s residence in Los Angeles inside a bag in O.J.’s Bronco.

Here’s what was disclosed in the third and fourth episodes.

Media  gather outside Nicole Brown Simpson's home on June 13, 1994, one day after the killings. Media  gather outside Nicole Brown Simpson's home on June 13, 1994, one day after the killings.

Media assemble outside Nicole Brown Simpson’s dwelling on June 13, 1994, merely a day subsequent to the murders. (Vinnie Zuffante/Getty Images)

  • Denise characterized the act of interring her sibling while her ex-brother-in-law was under scrutiny but not yet detained as a “horrific ordeal.” He was also present at the vigil.

  • Overcome with tears, she discussed the necessity of finding a high-necked garment to clothe Nicole in due to her being “nearly decapitated.”

  • Nicole’s confidante Robin Greer recollected O.J. looming over the casket, repetitively muttering, “Nicole, I’m so sorry,” which felt like an admission of guilt.

  • O.J. requested Nicole’s sibling Dominique to accompany him to the coffin (“Why me?” she pondered). As they knelt, she recounted how he fixated on inquiring about a ring he had gifted Nicole, eager to know its whereabouts.

  • Denise recollected lawyer Robert Shapiro inquiring during the wake, “Can we exhume the body?” before Nicole had even been laid to rest.

  • O.J. vacated the vigil in the identical vehicle as Nicole’s mother, Juditha Brown.

  • D’Anne Purcilly remarked, “’Dita’ queried him, ‘Did you perpetrate this?’ And O.J. leaned forward, gazed downward and confessed, ‘I adored her excessively.’ He didn’t admit to doing it but maintained insisting on his excessive love for her.”

  • At the secluded internment the following day, Purcilly questioned O.J.’s confidant Al Cowlings if O.J. was culpable, to which he responded, “I honestly don’t know.” She mentioned Cowlings, one of O.J.’s staunchest backers, later denied uttering such words.

O.J. Simpson was present at both the vigil and the funeral — captured here on June 16, 1994 — preceding his arrest relative to the murders.O.J. Simpson was present at both the vigil and the funeral — captured here on June 16, 1994 — preceding his arrest relative to the murders.

O.J. Simpson was present at both the vigil and the funeral — depicted here on June 16, 1994 — prior to his detention for the murders. (Lee Celano/WireImage)

  • O.J. failed to surrender to law enforcement as previously arranged and the notorious Bronco escapade ensued on June 17, 1994. From within his automobile, O.J. — who composed a farewell note, broadcast on television by his defender Robert Kardashian — reached out to Juditha declaring that he was en route to Orange County, the Browns’ abode and Nicole’s final resting place, to visit the gravesite.

  • Dominique remembered O.J. articulating, “I’m going to be with Nicole” and Denise interpreted the family’s belief that he contemplated ending his life. Their father, Lou Brown, sank down amidst the turmoil.

  • Cognizant that the authorities were on the lookout for O.J., Purcilly, stationed at the Browns’ household, persuaded Nicole’s youngest sibling Tanya that they must summon law enforcement. “‘We are aware of his whereabouts,’” Purcilly reminisced about informing the police. “‘He is on Interstate 405 heading this direction.’”

  • Denise and Dominique expressed that they embarked in a vehicle with the intention of “intercepting” O.J. during the low-speed expressway chase. They quickly comprehended their plan was ill-conceived and abandoned the attempt.

Drivers halted their vehicles to observe the pursuit of the white Ford Bronco, operated by Al Cowlings, with O.J. Simpson as a passenger, on the 405 freeway in Los Angeles on June 17, 1994.Drivers halted their vehicles to observe the pursuit of the white Ford Bronco, operated by Al Cowlings, with O.J. Simpson as a passenger, on the 405 freeway in Los Angeles on June 17, 1994.

Drivers halted their vehicles to observe the pursuit of the white Ford Bronco, operated by Al Cowlings, with O.J. Simpson as a passenger, on the 405 freeway in Los Angeles on June 17, 1994. (Jean-Marc Giboux/Liaison)

  • Ex-Los Angeles Police Department Detective Tom Lange, who was on the line with O.J. during the renowned Bronco chase, remembered engaging him in conversation to help ensure his survival. Cowlings, at the wheel, informed law enforcement that O.J. had a firearm to his own head.

  • Lange noted that O.J. appeared exhausted or possibly affected by substances. He recounted how O.J. disclosed that he had already bid farewell to his offspring.

  • The vehicle pursuit, which spanned over two counties and captivated 95 million onlookers, ended at O.J.’s residence in Los Angeles. Lange elaborated on the contents found in the travel luggage O.J. carried in the Bronco: a firearm, an incognito kit, his passport, his NFL Hall of Fame insignia, and a series of keys on a teddy bear keychain.

  • Prior to Nicole’s demise, she had mentioned to her mother that a set of keys from her freshly acquired abode—post their 1992 separation—had gone missing, leading her to speculate if O.J. had taken them. Lange mentioned they conducted tests and confirmed the keys fit Nicole’s home, but this evidence was not presented in the criminal trial. O.J. dismissed the allegations of taking the keys in a sworn testimony for the civil case filed by the Browns and Goldmans, which held him liable in 1997.

O.J. Simpson's booking photo. O.J. Simpson's booking photo.

O.J. was taken into custody on allegations of homicide on June 17, 1994. (Nation Bill/Corbis Sygma/Sygma via Getty Images)

Doubts raised by O.J.’s defense team regarding his narrative

  • Limo chauffeur Allan Park, tasked with driving O.J. to the terminal on the evening of the murders, shared observations with O.J.’s legal advisors, Skip Taft and Shapiro, prior to the initial hearing.

  • Park conveyed that he repeatedly rang the bell at O.J.’s abode for an extended duration before receiving a response from O.J. claiming he was asleep. Just moments prior, Park had witnessed a figure entering the domicile. He also remembered O.J. excessively perspiring, even though he had just emerged from a shower.

  • Unbeknownst to Park, his discussion with the lawyers was recorded. The audio was later handed over to prosecutor Marcia Clark. Upon hearing it with Clark, they discovered O.J.’s legal representatives had continued recording after Park disconnected their call.

  • During playback, Park heard them remark, “That’s odd, that does not match O.J.’s account,” subtly casting doubt on O.J.’s explanation for his whereabouts. “Our jaws dropped,” Park recounted.

  • Michael Stevens, who once held the position of chief investigator for the Los Angeles County district attorney, was delegated the responsibility of finding proof of O.J.’s maltreatment of Nicole for the court proceedings. O.J. had in the past entered a no plea to spouse assault, and Denise had documented Nicole’s harms with photographs, though the fate of these images was uncertain.

  • A different informant led Stevens to the discovery that Nicole had a covert safe deposit box at a bank. When he accessed it, the initial item he saw was a Polaroid depicting her with an inflicted eye injury. The box contained a multitude of similar photographs.

  • Additionally, a diary cataloguing a litany of maltreatment incidents by Simpson, each documented with a corresponding locale, was present. “Realizing she was the last to place those images…in there sent a chill down my spine,” expressed Stevens.

  • The journals and notes of Nicole, along with her diary, were not admitted as proof in the legal trial, Denise recounted. Nevertheless, she had the opportunity to bear witness to the camera recordings of Nicole’s injuries and the abuses she endured.

  • Denise and Dominique reflected on how the defense unjustly portrayed Nicole as a nightlife aficionado, frequently out till dawn and engaging in relationships with other individuals.

  • Denise recalled Judge Lance Ito’s mandate for a silent courtroom as the verdict was announced, an event followed by 151 million people on Oct. 3, 1995. She recollected the piercing cry of Ron’s sister, Kim Goldman, upon hearing the verdict of not guilty.

Denise Brown provided testimony at the 1995 trial of O.J. Simpson regarding photographs she captured depicting Nicole Brown Simpson's contusions in 1989.Denise Brown provided testimony at the 1995 trial of O.J. Simpson regarding photographs she captured depicting Nicole Brown Simpson's contusions in 1989.

Denise Brown provided testimony at the 1995 trial of O.J. Simpson regarding photographs she captured depicting Nicole Brown Simpson’s contusions in 1989. (AFP via Getty Images)

  • While O.J. was incarcerated (bail being denied), Sydney and Justin resided with the Browns. Post release, O.J. took them to celebrate Sydney’s birthday at Michael Jackson’s estate. (O.J. spoke in 2018 about receiving support from Jackson through his trial and visiting Jackson’s Neverland on extended weekends.)

  • In 1996, the Browns’ pursuit of custody did not succeed.

  • Denise remarked that Juditha adeptly segregated the incidents to manage interactions with O.J. for the children’s visits.

  • Visits to the Browns continued until O.J. chose to relocate the children from California to Miami. Reportedly, Sydney informed her grandmother about her decision to move, which Juditha accepted without dispute. Denise recounted Juditha weeping nocturnally, grieving the loss of another “fragment of Nicole.”

O.J. SImpson was acquitted of murder charges on Oct. 3, 1995.                    O.J. SImpson was acquitted of murder charges on Oct. 3, 1995.

O.J. SImpson, center, was acquitted of murder charges on Oct. 3, 1995. (Reed Saxon/Pool/AFP via Getty Images)

Complications following the transfer to Florida

  • Complications persisted after the relocation of O.J. and the children to Florida in 2000. An off-camera producer informed Denise in the documentary series that nearly “17 police reports” were lodged. Additionally, there was a “sequence of 911 dispatches regarding altercations in the residence”; however, the anonymous nature of these calls prevented police from establishing credibility.

  • In 2003, Sydney summoned the Miami-Dade police subsequent to a dispute with O.J., which his lawyer dismissed as a typical disagreement between teenager and parent.

  • In 2001, the FBI searched O.J.’s residence as part of inquiries into narcotics smuggling and money laundering. Ex-FBI agents Gary Loeffert and Chris Piersza recounted their scrutiny of suspected trafficker Andrew Anderson, an acquaintance of O.J. staying at his abode frequently.

  • The agents posited that O.J. was receiving ecstasy and additional drugs from Anderson. Their search operation at O.J.’s accommodation, they noted, was compromised by a tip-off, evident by the presence of a reporter upon their arrival. Only residue of marijuana was uncovered.

  • O.J. would subsequently face a nine-year incarceration in Nevada for an armed robbery incident pertaining to sports memorabilia he alleged was his own; he was granted parole in 2017. He passed away in April from cancer.

For anyone necessitating assistance due to abuse, contact the National Domestic Violence Hotline at 1-800-799-7233. If speaking is not safe, visit thehotline.org or text LOVEIS to 22522 for support.

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